Ten Simple Way to tackle Reading Comprehension


[vc_row][vc_column][vc_cta h2=”Ten Ways for Better Scores on Bank Reading Passages “]Better scores on the Reading Comprehension questions in Bank Exam will generally feel elusive. There aren’t any “formulas” for Bank Exam Reading Comprehension, but as luck would have it there are some fast tips to raised Bank Exam scores on Reading Comprehension. These 10 tips will help you turn a foul Bank Exam score into a decent Bank Exam score.[/vc_cta][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_cta h2=”Focus on the gap and closing paragraphs of longer passages.” add_icon=”left” i_icon_fontawesome=”fa fa-search” i_color=”white” i_background_style=”rounded” i_background_color=”violet” i_size=”lg” i_on_border=”true”]The majority of the passages you’ll encounter on the reading comprehension questions of the bank exam are shorter, however one or two are longer. If you are running out of your time, read the opening and closing paragraphs and skim the center. the first and last paragraphs contain the passage’s main plan in most passages. you’ll be able to return and read body paragraphs more carefully as questions need it. Use context to assist you.[/vc_cta][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_cta h2=”Use context to help you.” add_icon=”left” i_icon_fontawesome=”fa fa-bars” i_color=”white” i_background_style=”rounded” i_background_color=”violet” i_size=”lg” i_on_border=”true”]If a question asks a few specific line, don’t return in to the passage and read simply that line. a good rule of thumb is to read at least two sentences before and after the line in question. this will provide you with a plan of where the point started and where the author is going with it.[/vc_cta][vc_cta h2=”Save unfamiliar passages for last. ” add_icon=”left” i_icon_fontawesome=”fa fa-search” i_color=”white” i_background_style=”rounded” i_background_color=”violet” i_size=”lg” i_on_border=”true”]The bank exam passages can cover a range of subjects, from history to science to literature. Like with any question type, do the questions that are easier first and save the tougher ones for last. every question is definitely worth the same quantity, thus you don’t need to waste an enormous chunk of your time on a passage with some questions once you may answer double as several questions on easier passages. If science passages are confusing to you, return to it one after you’ve completed the rest. the nice factor about the bank exam is that it allows you to skip around among an area, thus use this to your advantage.[/vc_cta][vc_cta h2=”Save unfamiliar passages for last. ” add_icon=”left” i_icon_fontawesome=”fa fa-question” i_color=”white” i_background_style=”rounded” i_background_color=”violet” i_size=”lg” i_on_border=”true”]The bank exam passages can cover a range of subjects, from history to science to literature. Like with any question type, do the questions that are easier first and save the tougher ones for last. every question is definitely worth the same quantity, thus you don’t need to waste an enormous chunk of your time on a passage with some questions once you may answer double as several questions on easier passages. If science passages are confusing to you, return to it one after you’ve completed the rest. the nice factor about the bank exam is that it allows you to skip around among an area, thus use this to your advantage.[/vc_cta][vc_cta h2=”Really understand what the question is asking.” add_icon=”left” i_icon_fontawesome=”fa fa-lightbulb-o” i_color=”white” i_background_style=”rounded” i_background_color=”violet” i_size=”lg” i_on_border=”true”]Reading comprehension questions have the most “gray area” of any question type on the bank exam. Some people skim through the question, not extremely understanding what it is specifically asking, begin reading the solution decisions, and decide the first one that sounds true. this is not a good strategy – repeatedly more than one answer alternative can ring true or part true with the passage, but just one will specifically and best answer that specific question.[/vc_cta][vc_cta h2=”Do not bring in outside knowledge.” add_icon=”left” i_icon_fontawesome=”fa fa-list” i_color=”white” i_background_style=”rounded” i_background_color=”violet” i_size=”lg” i_on_border=”true”]The bank exam does not require you to have any outside knowledge for the reading comprehension passages, so check any you have at the door. Your own biases might actually hurt you when answering the questions, especially if it is an opinion passage.[/vc_cta][vc_cta h2=”Note how bank exam vocabulary is used in the sentence.” add_icon=”left” i_icon_fontawesome=”fa fa-quote-right” i_color=”white” i_background_style=”rounded” i_background_color=”violet” i_size=”lg” i_on_border=”true”]You will encounter some “vocabulary in context” questions wherever you may incline attainable definitions of a vocabulary word within the passage. There is also quite one answer alternative that provides an accurate definition for the vocabulary word, however just one alternative can work the word during this specific context. Notice however the word is employed within the sentence, and connect the solution selections to check that one works best.[/vc_cta][vc_cta h2=”For “Select One or More Answer Choices“ questions, consider each choice separately.” add_icon=”left” i_icon_fontawesome=”fa fa-ellipsis-h” i_color=”white” i_background_style=”rounded” i_background_color=”violet” i_size=”lg” i_on_border=”true”]For some of the reading comprehension questions, you will have to choose one, two, or three of the answers. This format can lead you to second-guess yourself more than with a typical multiple-choice question where you can eliminate choices decisively. To avoid these issues, consider each choice separately and only select it if you feel that it could be the only correct answer to the question.[/vc_cta][vc_cta h2=”Underline and take notes as you read.” add_icon=”left” i_icon_fontawesome=”fa fa-pagelines” i_color=”white” i_background_style=”rounded” i_background_color=”violet” i_size=”lg” i_on_border=”true”]Read the passage actively. Underline key words or sentences that contain the main idea. Jot down any notes, probably just a word or two, that you think might help you. If the author is taking a side on a certain issue, write a positive or negative sign next to the passage to remind yourself later what his or her position is.[/vc_cta][vc_cta h2=”Avoid extreme answers.” add_icon=”left” i_icon_fontawesome=”fa fa-exclamation-circle” i_color=”white” i_background_style=”rounded” i_background_color=”violet” i_size=”lg” i_on_border=”true”]Generally, if a solution choice sounds very extreme in tone, it’s not the simplest choice. Be cautious of answers that use words like never, always, completely, etc. There’s usually an exception to the rule[/vc_cta][vc_cta h2=”Don’t make assumptions.” add_icon=”left” i_icon_fontawesome=”fa fa-share-square-o” i_color=”white” i_background_style=”rounded” i_background_color=”violet” i_size=”lg” i_on_border=”true”]Inferring and assumptive aren’t the same thing. when you infer, you create an inference supported the information within the passage. when you assume, you create an assumption that brings in outside data or biases and is not based entirely on the given passage. an assumption could seem valid, but if you can’t back it up with statements from the passage, it’s most likely best to stay faraway from it.[/vc_cta][vc_cta h2=”Beginner Level” h4=”This is the sample example for Beginner Level . My name is Ben and I come from Australia. I am 24 years old and I live in a small town near Sydney called Branton. I don’t have a job now, but normally I clean shop windows. I am not married but I live with my very beautiful girlfriend, Maria, in a nice house in Branton. We don’t have any children…maybe next year. My girlfriend is an actress, but she isn’t very famous. She acts in a small theatre in our town. At the weekend, we like to go swimming in a big lake near our house. I normally get up at eight o’clock, but on Thursday I get up at six o’clock because that is the day when I go running in the park.
” shape=”round”]1. Ben lives in Sydney, Australia.?

Ans : Ben lives in Sydney, Australia. FALSE, HE LIVES IN BRANTON, NEAR SYDNEY.

2. Ben is 26 years old.

Ans :Ben is 26 years old. FALSE, HE IS 24 YEARS OLD.

3. What do they do at the weekend?

Ans :THEY GO SWIMMING IN A BIG LAKE NEAR THEIR HOUSE.

4. When does Ben go running?

Ans :HE GOES RUNNING ON THURSDAY MORNINGS.

5. Where does Ben live?

Ans :HE LIVES IN THE TOWN OF BRANTON, NEAR SYDNEY.[/vc_cta][vc_cta h2=”Intermediate Level” h4=”(This is the Sample Example for Intermediate Level). Every year, Sweden publishes everyone’s income tax returns. So do Finland and Norway. And nobody really cares. By contrast, U.S. law prohibits releasing anybody’s tax information. Imagine the howl if the IRS put tax returns online, so co-workers, neighbors and mothers-in-law could see what someone earns. That happened in Italy earlier this year, when the outgoing government of prime minister Romano Prodi briefly posted taxpayers’ incomes on the Internet, and newspapers picked up the list. Two weeks ago, Sweden published the tax returns of ordinary wage-earners. In November or December, Swedes can see how much high-rollers made — with their income from dividends and other investments — plus how much they paid in taxes for 2007. Sweden’s policy of making tax returns public — as in Finland and Norway — stems from a tradition of open records and transparency in government, except in cases of national security and some aspects of criminal investigations. “The right of public access to documents is laid down in the constitution,“ Graner says of Sweden’s practice since the 18th century. Making the data public demonstrates the Scandinavian belif that nobody is better than anyone else, says Veera Heinonen, spokeswoman for the Finish Embassy in London. “Finland is a very egalitarian country, and it’s a very high-tax society, so it provides checks and balances,“ Heinonen says. She says people’s earnings can be a good source of gossip. Is anybody embarrassed? “Well, maybe some chief executives,“ she says. Ida Ragnarsson, 22, of Helsingborg, Sweden, says she doesn’t mind if anyone sees what she earns. Ragnarsson, who coaches sales people, says she has checked up on her family. “It’s fun to know how much they earn,“ she says. Italians didn’t think so in April when Vincenzo Visco, a deputy economy minister who spearheaded Italy’s fight against tax evasion, posted 2005 tax returns on the agency’s website. The gesture, Visco told Italian news organizations, was to encourage greater “transparency and democracy.“ The information was quickly removed from the website, but it was available long enough for newspapers to grab and publish figures about the rich. Philip Lindquist, 19, a student in Stockholm, says he doesn’t understand the fuss in Italy. “The model on which Sweden is built demands this“ public information, he says.” shape=”round”]1. According to the article, Italians:                                                                Ans: didn’t want their tax return information to be made public.

2.Why do the Scandinavian countries make everyone’s tax information public?       Ans: Because they have a tradition of open records and transparency in government.

3.An individual’s tax information might not be published if:

Ans: there’s an ongoing criminal investigation.

4.How long has this been going on in Sweden?

Ans: Since the 18th Century

5.Is this likely to happen in the United States?

Ans:No, this is against the law in the United States.[/vc_cta][vc_cta h2=”Advance Level” h4=”( This is the Sample Example for Experts). Safety At The Sea Forget razor fish. The lesser weever is the fish to look out for on British beaches. The fish, which has venomous spines on its gills and dorsal fin, is common in many areas of the UK, including the Cardigan Bay area of Wales. It lies virtually buried in the sand with just its mouth and fin exposed, a trap for hapless fishermen and beachgoers wading around in the shallows. If you stand on a weever fish, you are likely to feel a sharp prick-like sensation which gets worse and spreads along your leg, often causing swelling. Allergy Many people have an allergic reaction to the fish and may start to sweat, develop a rapid pulse and feel nauseous as the poison gets further into the body. Some people collapse as a result. Others can develop chest pain, although the sting is not fatal. People who have been stung should take painkillers and if they develop an allergic reaction to the sting, a course of antihistamines is recommended. Other common poisonous fish on Britain’s beaches include jelly fish and the stingray, which, if disturbed, can use its tail to venomous effect. Sea currents But fish are the least of your worries on the beach. The force of the sea is much more dangerous than anything swimming about inside it. Over the weekend, two people nearly drowned in the Bournemouth area after getting out of their depth swimming. One was just 16 years old. They are both now in stable condition in hospital. “We were much more hit by that than sunburn cases where the message seems to be getting home,“ said a spokesman for the Royal Bournemouth Hospital. In other areas, the situation was less dramatic with a handful of sunburn and sprained ankles reported in other sunspots, including Cornwall, Blackpool and Brighton. Coastguards are warning the public not to swim if there is a red flag flying on a beach and to find out about local tides and currents. Safe swimming The Coastguard Agency says people should not swim if they feel unwell, for at least an hour after a meal, if they have been drinking alcohol or if they are cold and tired. They also warn against swimming alone, swimming too far out to sea and snorkling if you have breathing problems. And you should avoid cliff edges, even on gentle slopes, when they have been dampened by sea spray. One organisation that aims to help swimmers who get into trouble is the UK’s answer to Baywatch, the Surf Lifesaving Association of Great Britain. Founded in 1955 and based on an idea originated in Australia, it now has 81 branches and has made 17,500 rescues. The association has three types of member: Nippers (aged eight to 12), Junior (aged 12 to 16) and Seniors and Masters. Its motto is ‘Vigilance and Service’. All members are surfers trained in lifesaving skills. They paddle out across the waves to save struggling swimmers. Most of their money comes from fundraising events, but local councils also provide some funding. Another danger on the beach is pollution. A recent survey of UK beaches showed more than 10% are failing to meet minimum standards for clean water. The Marine Conservation Society said raw sewage was still being pumped into the sea in some areas and was findiing its way onto beaches. But the water companies say the society’s standards are too tough and that 90% of British beaches pass European standards.” shape=”round”]

  1. Which of these is NOT true of the lesser weever?

It buries itself deep in the sand.

2.Which of these people should be safe swimming?

A person who has celebrated with non-alcoholic beer.

3.Why does the Coastguard Agency suggest people keep away from cliffs?

People could fall off them.

4. What sentence best summarises the pollution situation on UK beaches?

There are some very dirty beaches, but most are fine.

5.Which of these is the more serious danger on a British beach?

Deep water.[/vc_cta][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Comments


Like it? Share with your friends!

54

Comments 0

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may also like